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Tax Law: Timeline and Schedule of Transfer Taxes

Small wonder tax debt relief continues to be a main component of contemporary life in America. According to tax lawyer New Jersey, while many citizens receive sizable refunds at tax time, occasionally coming up woefully short is not uncommon. In recent past, about 20 percent of all taxpayers filed a tax return with an outstanding balance of more than $3,500.

tax lawyer serving in Jersey

The IRS levied tax lien: Tax debt is most often collected by the federal tax lien office. This office is an agency of the U.S. government that seeks to collect federal tax liabilities. The tax lien office may issue federal tax liens, or tax deeds, to tax delinquent property owners. A tax lien is the government’s first opportunity to seize property needed to satisfy tax liability obligations. If the tax lien owner does not respond to a levy within a specified time period (usually ten days), the tax collector may then issue a federal tax lien and sell the property at auction to satisfy the tax liability.

 

Taxpayers must engage in a “compromise” with the Internal Revenue Service before a tax debt can be satisfied. Compromise agreements are typically drawn up between the Internal Revenue Service and the tax debtor. Under such agreements, taxpayers agree to pay a lump sum, commonly called a “settlement”, in return for the Internal Revenue Service dropping the entire amount owed. In exchange, the Internal Revenue Service agrees not to pursue collection on the remaining amount. Failure to comply with these agreement not only affects the outstanding balance owed, but also the tax debt owed to the Government.

 

How do you go about paying your tax debt? One way is to arrange for a “pay as you go” cell phone plan, or use a post-dated check received from your bank. A tax lien holder should be able to deposit the tax owed directly into a designated bank account. Some tax lien holders will allow you to make partial payments by mail or by use of a post dated check.

 

Tax lawyers specialize in helping taxpayers resolve their tax debts. Often, the only way to settle a tax debt is to hire a tax lawyer to negotiate a payment plan. Tax attorneys can advise you on how to structure your payment to meet your budget. They can also help you avoid potential tax liabilities after the fact by protecting your assets. Tax lawyers may represent you before an administrative law judge, a United States Tax Court, or a United States Tax Commission proceeding.

 

There are many strategies to deal with delinquent taxes. Many taxpayers choose to sell their homes in order to pay off their delinquent taxes. This strategy often results in financial difficulties for the family. Other taxpayers choose to settle their tax debts by taking out a loan at a low interest rate. The IRS may agree to accept a settlement if the taxpayer is willing to make regular monthly payments over the course of a specified time period.

 

Taxpayers who can afford to make regular monthly payments but cannot do so because of other financial obligations, can work out a compromise agreement with the IRS. In a compromise agreement, the taxpayer and IRS come to an agreement on a reasonable payment schedule for the taxpayer’s tax debt. Payment is generally made twice a year, usually in the form of a partial monthly installment. Installment agreement resolutions will not hold up in court. Taxpayers must prepare and follow the required tax debt compromise agreement before any court proceedings take place. An irate taxpayer cannot force the IRS to accept a compromise agreement.

 

The IRS treats taxpayers who can’t pay their tax debts in full as “payants” and non taxpayers as “defendants.” Defendants receive periodic assessments, which amount to their tax debt, while payees are assessed with late payment penalties. The IRS also reserves the right to tack on additional fees to unpaid balances, in order to recover the full amount of tax debt. If tax debtors fail to pay their overdue balance, they may become subject to criminal prosecution. However, the IRS has the authority to offer deferred tax relief, or in some circumstances, settle tax debts by allowing taxpayers to file for an Offer in Compromise.